EMPOWERED PARENTS,

POWERFUL CHOICES

Did you know that your children are seven times more likely to get the human papillomavirus (HPV) at some point in their lives than they are to develop diabetes? Around 80% of men and women will be infected with the virus in their lifetime.

Speak to your doctor today to understand the choices and options that are available for you and your child.

HPV: NO SYMPTOMS, NO SIGNS

HPV symptoms are nearly non-existent, and HPV infections can cause serious diseases and even certain types of cancer – in both women and men. That’s why we want to enable all parents with the knowledge and tools to make powerful choices about their children’s health.

THE LINK BETWEEN HPV AND CERVICAL CANCER

Certain human papillomavirus (HPV) strains can cause cervical cancer later in your daughters’ lives, as well as other types of cancer in men and women. Cervical cancer is the eighth leading female cancer in Singapore. About 429 new cervical cancer cases were diagnosed annually in Singapore in 2018. In younger women aged 15 to 44 years, cervical cancer is even more common. About 208 women lose the battle against cervical cancer in Singapore each year. For those aged 15 to 44, cervical cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths.

SPEAK TO A DOCTOR TO KNOW YOUR OPTIONS

Your doctor is the best person to have an in-depth conversation about HPV prevention, so don’t hesitate to understand more about the choices that are out there for your children. However, we know that it might be overwhelming for some to approach this subject and knowing where to start might be difficult. So we’ve put together this simple, downloadable one-page FAQ guide which you can use on your mobile phone when you’re at the clinic. To understand what your child is eligible for, remember to make an appointment with your doctor to learn more about how you can reduce the risk of your daughters developing cervical cancer later in their lives. Make an informed decision today.

EMPOWERED PARENTS,

POWERFUL CHOICES

Did you know that your children are seven times more likely to get the human papillomavirus (HPV) at some point in their lives than they are to develop diabetes? Around 80% of men and women will be infected with the virus in their lifetime.

Speak to your doctor today to understand the choices and options that are available for you and your child.

HPV: NO SYMPTOMS, NO SIGNS

HPV symptoms are nearly non-existent, and HPV infections can cause serious diseases and even certain types of cancer – in both women and men. That’s why we want to enable all parents with the knowledge and tools to make powerful choices about their children’s health.

HPV: NO SYMPTOMS, NO SIGNS

HPV symptoms are nearly non-existent, and HPV infections can cause serious diseases and even certain types of cancer – in both women and men. That’s why we want to enable all parents with the knowledge and tools to make powerful choices about their children’s health.

THE LINK BETWEEN HPV AND CERVICAL CANCER

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Certain human papillomavirus (HPV) strains can cause cervical cancer later in your daughters’ lives, as well as other types of cancer in men and women. Cervical cancer is the eighth leading female cancer in Singapore. About 429 new cervical cancer cases were diagnosed annually in Singapore in 2018. In younger women aged 15 to 44 years, cervical cancer is even more common. About 208 women lose the battle against cervical cancer in Singapore each year. For those aged 15 to 44, cervical cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths.

SPEAK TO A DOCTOR TO KNOW YOUR OPTIONS

Your doctor is the best person to have an in-depth conversation about HPV prevention, so don’t hesitate to understand more about the choices that are out there for your children. However, we know that it might be overwhelming for some to approach this subject and knowing where to start might be difficult. So we’ve put together this simple, downloadable one-page FAQ guide which you can use on your mobile phone when you’re at the clinic. To understand what your child is eligible for, remember to make an appointment with your doctor to learn more about how you can reduce the risk of your daughters developing cervical cancer later in their lives. Make an informed decision today.

"Singaporeans are 7x more likely to get HPV at some point than they are to develop diabetes.1"

COMMON QUESTIONS

HPV is the most common viral infection among sexually active adults. Around 80% of women and men will be infected with the virus in their lifetime. There are more than 100 strains of this virus and around 40 HPV types that affect the genital area. HPV often shows no signs or symptoms.
The majority of HPV infections clear on their own. In cases where the virus remains, it may turn into genital warts or cancer. Some people find out they have HPV when genital warts appear, others when they are diagnosed with more serious problems like cervical cancer.
One way to help your child prevent HPV would be vaccination. However, depending on the age of your child, we recommend setting up an appointment with your doctor to learn more about your child’s eligibility. When your children reach adulthood, it is recommended that regular health screenings for cervical cancer be done with their doctor.
According to Singapore’s Ministry Of Health, HPV vaccines are recommended for females between the ages of 9-26.  Please speak to your doctor today to know more. The vaccine is most effective if given at a young age because that’s when the immune response is strongest and is prior to sexual exposure.
Boys should be protected against HPV, as it can lead to genital warts or even certain cancers later in life.
This is a common, debunked myth about HPV vaccination. Recently, a multi-year survey conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found no statistically significant links between areas with HPV vaccine legislation and adolescent sexual behaviours.
Vaccines, like any medicine, can have side effects. Some people who get the HPV vaccine have no side effects at all. Some people report having mild side effects, like a sore arm from the shot for a day or two. The most common side effects are usually mild and go away on their own. Be sure to speak to your doctor about the vaccine’s suitability for your children.
You can use this clinic locator tool to find a clinic close to you and request an appointment and make the right choice for your child.

COMMON QUESTIONS

HPV is the most common viral infection among sexually active adults. Around 80% of women and men will be infected with the virus in their lifetime. There are more than 100 strains of this virus and around 40 HPV types that affect the genital area. HPV often shows no signs or symptoms.
The majority of HPV infections clear on their own. In cases where the virus remains, it may turn into genital warts or cancer. Some people find out they have HPV when genital warts appear, others when they are diagnosed with more serious problems like cervical cancer.
One way to help your child prevent HPV would be vaccination. However, depending on the age of your child, we recommend setting up an appointment with your doctor to learn more about your child’s eligibility. When your children reach adulthood, it is recommended that regular health screenings for cervical cancer be done with their doctor.
According to Singapore’s Ministry Of Health, HPV vaccines are recommended for females between the ages of 9-26.  Please speak to your doctor today to know more. The vaccine is most effective if given at a young age because that’s when the immune response is strongest and is prior to sexual exposure.
Boys should be protected against HPV, as it can lead to genital warts or even certain cancers later in life.
This is a common, debunked myth about HPV vaccination. Recently, a multi-year survey conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found no statistically significant links between areas with HPV vaccine legislation and adolescent sexual behaviours.
Vaccines, like any medicine, can have side effects. Some people who get the HPV vaccine have no side effects at all. Some people report having mild side effects, like a sore arm from the shot for a day or two. The most common side effects are usually mild and go away on their own. Be sure to speak to your doctor about the vaccine’s suitability for your children.
You can use this clinic locator tool to find a clinic close to you and request an appointment and make the right choice for your child.

"The HPV vaccine is most effective if given at a young age. "

HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS (HPV) -RELATED DISEASES

Why take a chance on your children’s lives? Protecting them from HPV now will help reduce their risk of serious diseases later in life. HPV infections are responsible for approximately:

CERVICAL CANCER

99%

ANAL CANCER

in males and females

85-90%

VULVAR CANCER

30%

GENITAL WARTS

in males and females

>90%

VAGINAL CANCER

70 - 75%
For Parents 1

SURVIVOR STORIES

Play Video

TERI CHOONG

Teri was young and healthy when she received a shocking cervical cancer diagnosis. Now, her mission is to educate others about how to prevent this devastating disease.

For Parents 1

SURVIVOR STORIES

Play Video

TERI CHOONG

Teri was young and healthy when she received a shocking cervical cancer diagnosis. Now, her mission is to educate others about how to prevent this devastating disease.

FIND A CLINIC

Protect your children’s health to the fullest and reduce their risk of cancer later in life. Find a clinic closest to you and set up an appointment to speak with your doctor about protecting your children against HPV, and the choices they have.

FIND A CLINIC

Protect your children’s health to the fullest and reduce their cancer later in life. Find a clinic closest to you and set up an appointment to speak with your doctor about protecting your children against HPV, and the choices they have.

For Parents 3

SIGN THE PLEDGE

Now that you’re informed, are you ready to take a stand? Join parents across Singapore who understand the importance of protecting their children against HPV and HPV-related diseases.

SIGN THE PLEDGE

Now that you’re informed, are you ready to take a stand? Join parents across Singapore who understand the importance of protecting their children against HPV and HPV-related diseases.